Focusing® technique is one of the most empathic and respectful experiential methods developed in the psychology that I know. With the Focusing® attitude, your suffering is respected while being conversed in a different way to release those voices or moments suppressed, ignored, frozen, or postponed in your life. Focusing® principles and strategies have been successfully incorporated into psychotherapy.

Many times we have an idea of ​​what disturbs us in life. Others, it is just a vague annoyance to which it is difficult for us to put into words. With Focusing®, we can transform this vague feeling into a well-defined "felt sense" with which we can work, dialogue and open ourselves to other processes of psychological development in your life. 


Your thinking and emotions is what you already know about your situation. However, there is much more implicit in your experience that has not yet been symbolized and that you don’t know. For positive, lasting, meaningful and sustainable results over time, you need to pay attention to your implicit process. 

Traditional therapies uses what is explicit, such as cognitive (beliefs), behavioral or emotions, through questions and answers. Focusing® Oriented Psychotherapy responds to the demand for quick results while allowing you to stop and listen to your implicit process. This makes its final development more complete.

For example, if I ask you, what are your feelings or thoughts at this time? It’s very likely that your answer is the feelings or thoughts that you already know or are familiar to you. Why would you want to connect with them again and again if you already know them and have done enough? Scientifically proven, from the implicit process you can learn more about yourself and fully develop your Talent and Strengths.

Focusing-Oriented Psychotherapy, by Gendlin.

Focusing® was discovered by Eugene Gendlin, PhD. who, from his research, concluded that people who make a successful change had at first a vague sense difficult to describe. They made an inner awareness, a bodily sense of their problems. Whether a person can pay attention to what he called "felt sense" or "sense of the situation" turns out to be a key component of successful develop processes.